The 2018 Farm Bill: What it Means for Hemp and CBD

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on December 11, 2018

The House Committee on Agriculture is in the process of finalizing the 2018 Farm Bill, which is expected to go into effect later this month. It’s likely that the bill’s provisions will include the legalization of hemp, in the form of the removal of the plant from the government’s list of Schedule I Controlled Substances. Not only will this mean that hemp can be grown much more widely, it will also affect the production of hemp derivatives, including hemp-derived CBD. However, the legality of CBD products remains more complicated than this news may suggest.

As discussed in a prior blog post, the legal status of CBD can be very confusing to consumers, businesses, and lawmakers alike. As a substance that is derived from the cannabis plant, but is not cannabis’ main active ingredient, CBD currently occupies an unclear middle ground – particularly in California, where the state has imposed additional rules affecting how the various types of CBD may be legally used.

The legalization of hemp, though a step forward in the overall process of cannabis legalization, doesn’t do much to resolve the confusion surrounding CBD products. Even after hemp is legalized, CBD will be considered a drug and therefore subject to regulation by the FDA. Though the FDA has approved certain cannabis-derived CBD medications, CBD’s status as a drug makes it illegal to use as an ingredient in any kind of food or food additive.

Topicals, oils, and other non-edible forms of hemp-derived CBD, on the other hand, may not necessarily be banned once hemp is legalized. However, the FDA has yet to make a statement regarding this possibility – though they have sent unambiguous legal warnings to CBD businesses that make unsubstantiated or false claims about their products, indicating that they plan to regulate all CBD products to some degree, they’re less clear about the future legal status of hemp-derived CBD and non-edible hemp derivatives in general. 

In California, the law on CBD edibles will remain paradoxical even after hemp is legalized. While CBD products with THC levels of 0.3% or more will be treated as cannabis edibles and therefore legal, CBD products with lower THC levels – or no THC at all – will be considered food products and therefore banned, regardless of whether they’re derived from cannabis or hemp. However, hemp-based non-edible CBD products are not currently regulated by any state agency, meaning their legal status remains unclear. For the sake of the state’s cannabis consumers and businesses, hopefully California will respond to the new Farm Bill by clarifying the legal status of these products.

For more information on the legal status of hemp and CBD, check our Guide to California Cannabis Laws or contact our cannabis attorneys at info@margolinlawrence.com

Cannabis Update: New York / New Jersey

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on December 5, 2018

Steps toward the legalization of cannabis in New York and New Jersey have been in the news recently. But how close are these states to having fully licensed legal cannabis supply chains? Here's a brief overview of the two states' marijuana laws and where they stand in regard to cannabis licensing.

NY State Licensing Overview

Currently, there are ten (10) “Registered Organizations” responsible for manufacturing and distributing medical marijuana in New York State. Pursuant to the Compassionate Care Act (CCA), which established New York’s comprehensive medical marijuana program in July 2014, each Registered Organization is authorized to have up to four (4) dispensing facilities. 

New York’s State Department of Health (NYSDOH) began accepting applications for registrations for a Registered Organization on April 27, 2015, with a deadline for receipt of applications on June 5, 2015. Of the original 43 applicants, five (5) Registered Organizations were approved July 31, 2015; another five (5) were registered by NYSDOH on August 1, 2017. The NYSDOH has yet to announce opening another application window for additional prospective Registered Organizations.

While New York’s Medical Marijuana Program is currently closed to would-be applicants looking to manufacture and dispense medical marijuana under the CCA, a spokesperson for Gov. Andrew Cuomo recently stated that the administration expects to introduce a comprehensive proposal for legalizing and regulating recreational adult-use marijuana in 2019. Therefore, cannabis businesses interested in becoming licensed in New York State should be looking down the road to determine next steps in preparation for licensure.

NJ State Licensing Overview

Currently, there are six (6) “Alternative Treatment Centers” (ATCs) responsible for manufacturing and distributing medical marijuana in New Jersey, pursuant to the Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act, which established the state's medical marijuana program in 2011. In August 2018, the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) accepted 146 applications in response to its request to add up to six (6) additional ATCs. Despite a November 1st target date, NJDOH has yet to announce the successful applicants, stating that additional time is needed to complete a full review of the applications submitted. The NJDOH is not currently accepting applications to open additional ATCs. But on November 26th, the state Senate and Assembly budget committees passed Senate Act S2426, which, once passed by the full Senate and Assembly and signed into law by Gov. Phil Murphy, would require the NJDOH to issue licenses for 34 new dispensaries and six new cultivation facilities within 90 days.

Additionally, the most recent version of the New Jersey Cannabis Regulatory and Expungement Aid Modernization Act (the NJ Act) was released last week and also passed by the state Senate and Assembly budget committees yesterday, November 26th. The next step for New Jersey is a vote by the full Senate and Assembly slated for mid-December. Until then, negotiations between Gov. Phil Murphy and NJ’s legislature will continue, mostly with regard to the tax rate and how much power the proposed Cannabis Regulatory Commission will exercise over the industry.

Next Steps

Because New York is at the inception of legalizing recreational marijuana, regulations and licensing requirements for adult-use cannabis businesses have not yet been implemented. That being said, a review of the NYSDOH Medical Marijuana Program Application for Registration as a Registered Organization (https://www.health.ny.gov/forms/doh-5138.pdf) is likely a good place to start for prospective medical and recreational cannabis businesses alike.

New Jersey is closer than New York to recreational legalization, and could have a bill passed before 2019. It is important for anyone looking to establish a medical cannabis business in New Jersey to keep an eye on the passage of S2426, which would mandate NJDOH’s licensure of 34 new dispensaries and 6 cultivation facilities within ninety (90) days. However, it remains unclear whether the NJDOH would open another application window, or choose from the 146 applications submitted in August 2018. In the meantime, it would behoove any prospective cannabis business licensee to take a look at both the NJ Act (S2703), as well as the ATC permit request application materials (https://www.nj.gov/health/medicalmarijuana/alt-treatment-centers/applications.shtml). Because the NJ Act gives local governments the power to enact their own cannabis regulations and ordinances – prospective licensees will first need to make sure their cannabis business will be permitted by their local jurisdiction.

While we recognize that any future recreational adult-use business license applications will differ from the above-mentioned applications for Registered Organizations and ATCs, much of the information requested will most certainly be the same. As is standard throughout jurisdictions that have legalized the use of both medical and recreational marijuana, any cannabis business seeking licensure will need to make full disclosures of entity, ownership and financial information, as well as identify and describe proposed facility locations, buildings and equipment. Additionally, those seeking licensure will need to provide licensing authorities with an extensive operating plan with detailed descriptions of policies and procedures related to its operations including but not limited to: processes, devices, security, quality assurance, recalls, staffing and record keeping.

To get a head start as the regulatory frameworks for cannabis businesses in New York and New Jersey continue to develop, anyone looking to establish a cannabis business in either state should be taking steps to create a tentative operating plan, focusing on those aspects and information that can be reasonably assumed as required for any future licensing application.

For more information on cannabis licensing in New York, New Jersey, and any other state, contact our cannabis attorneys at info@margolinlawrence.com.

How Would a White Labeling Ban Affect Cannabis Business?

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on December 3, 2018

What is white labeling, and how might the proposed white labeling ban affect commercial cannabis deal structures?

Both established and nascent players in the cannabis industry have turned to white labeling – rebranding an existing product under a different producer's name – as a means to carve out their niche. For instance, some manufacturers in the process  of obtaining proper local and state licenses have entered into contractual arrangements whereby they source product from licensed cultivators or manufacturers before branding and distributing the product as their own. Other deals see established brands, traditionally unassociated with cannabis, staking their industry claim by offering their intellectual property (branding) and promotional efforts in joint ventures with licensed manufacturers looking to find brand awareness for their product.

Despite the fact that white labeling is standard operating procedure in product manufacturing at large, the current version of the California Bureau of Cannabis Control’s proposed regulations have been interpreted by industry stakeholders who are disturbed at what is being called an outright ban on intellectual property licensing. While §5032 seems to be taking aim at arrangements whereby non-licensees are purchasing, packaging and selling cannabis without a license, the language has been interpreted to reach as far as to ban licensees from entering into trademark licensing agreements with brand owners. Such interpretation could even prohibit a parent company from holding its licensed cannabis manufacturing operations in one entity and its unlicensed brand in another – suggesting the need for license options to facilitate trademark licensing in the cannabis space:


If  §5032 is promulgated as currently drafted, the strictest interpretation would force parties currently engaged in white labeling to re-structure their deals or get proper licensing. Established brands may need to sell rather than license trademarks – effectively forcing or keeping brand owners out of the cannabis industry and companies holding their brands in separate entities may need to obtain additional licenses – an expensive and time consuming endeavor.

Other types of arrangements may or may not meet regulatory requirements. For instance, would it be OK for a cannabis brand to operate as an unlicensed subsidiary of a licensed manufacturer? What if the unlicensed cannabis brand acquires an ownership interest in the licensed manufacturer, but remains unlicensed itself? At the moment, the answers to these questions are unclear.


Until the industry is provided with some official guidance from the BCC or the regulations are tested, many licensees and non-licensees operating in cannabis will need to examine and possibly modify their business relationships or look into licensing options in attempt to stay compliant.

Fun fact: Wine industry folks who purchase bulk wine before bottling/branding/selling it as their own combine two licenses (17/20) to achieve ABC compliance. A type 17 is a beer/wine wholesaler license and a type 20 is an off-premise beer/wine retailer license.

For more information on cannabis business and licensing, reach out to our California cannabis attorneys at info@margolinlawrence.com.

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This blog is not intended as legal advice and should not be taken as such. The possession, use, and/or sale of marijuana is illegal under federal law.