Guest Blog: Los Angeles Teachers' Strike

Posted by ELR on January 15, 2019

Yesterday, teachers in 900 schools across the Los Angeles Unified School District went on strike, forming picket lines in the rain to protest unfair working conditions. For more context on the situation, we're presenting a guest blog post by an individual with experience working as a teacher in the LA school system. 

"If all the raindrops were lemon drops and gumdrops, oh, what a rain that would be!  Standing outside with my mouth open wide…ah, ah, ah, ah, ah, ah, ah, ah, ah, ah!"

A perfect children’s song for such a rainy day, but not for today in the city of LA.  If I had to re-write the lyrics, it would sound like: the sky is crying today, as thousands of teachers are marching throughout LA. Oh, what a shame this is.

The Los Angeles education system is in crisis! Humpty Dumpty has fallen off the wall! The bough has been broken and the cradle has fallen!

Did we not see the writing on the wall this day was coming? Politicians have turned their heads, with fingers in their ears for 30 years, while our teachers have tried to manage over crowded classrooms.

The “Old Lady in the Shoe…” Sound familiar? Why do teachers have to beg for additional staff support, as well as a few extra dollars to replace out of pocket expenses?

The Los Angeles Unified School District teachers have bent over backwards! We have witnessed many accounts of disrespect from top administration, parents, and sadly from the very ones that we are expected to educate.

How did we get here?

During my primary years of education in the Los Angeles school system, there was no way that the thought to sass an adult, never the less a teacher, entered my mind.  A teacher was guarded in the same way as a parent. They were a step below your mother. You listened, you obeyed and you honored them!

The teachers of yesteryear gained support from parents, top administration and the community.  The classrooms were well-managed, with aides rotating to reinforce the day’s lesson. The administration provided opportunities for exposure with electives such as sewing, cooking, automotive, electronics and typesetting – just to name a few – that helped shape me!

Education was important! Children were important!  Again, how did we get here?

Did it start with the misuse of standardized testing? I’m just saying! Maybe? Perhaps?

I pray that Humpty Dumpty can be put back together again!

To the teachers of the Los Angeles Unified School District, thank you for wanting more than “curds and whey!”

Strike on!

- "ELR," LA supporter and mother

California Jurisdictions Open for Cannabis Retail

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on January 8, 2019

Despite all the talk about cannabis retail in the news, it can be difficult to tell exactly when and where it's possible for businesses to apply for a cannabis retail license. Here are a few jurisdictions where applications for cannabis retail are either currently open or planned to open in the near future. 

Riverside County

Per the county planning department, Riverside is planning to give out a maximum of 19 retail licenses. While no date is currently set, the proposal process is scheduled to begin later this year.


Santa Barbara County

County is currently accepting cannabis permit applications. Storefront retail permits are limited to eight countywide, with no more than two in any supervisorial district.


Cathedral City

Applications for retail businesses are currently open, with an application form available on the city website.


City of Chula Vista

The city’s application for cannabis businesses will open on January 14th and remain open until the 18th (for Storefront Retail, Non-Storefront Retail, and Cultivation businesses) and the 25th (for Manufacturing, Distribution, and Testing Laboratory businesses.)


City of Desert Hot Springs

Conditional use permits for cannabis activities, including Cannabis Sale Facilities, are available on the city’s website.


City of Goleta

Goleta is currently accepting applications for up to 15 total storefront retail businesses.


City of Jurupa Valley

Jurupa Valley will accept priority applications for cannabis retail from January 22nd to February 6th, with non-priority applications opening on April 1st. The number of retail businesses permitted will be linked to the city's population, with 1 license given for every 15,000 residents. This currently means that the number of licenses given will be capped at 7. 

 

City of Lompoc

Lompoc is currently accepting cannabis retail license applications.


City of Moreno Valley

In December, the city raised its cap on dispensary licenses from 8 to 23. In addition to admitting qualified applicants from the last round of applications, the city will make proposal forms for new applicants available online.


City of Pasadena

The city will license up to 6 retail establishments. The permit application process is open on the city website through January 31st.


City of San Diego

The city is currently accepting applications for cannabis outlets with retail sales, up to a limit of four businesses per council district.


City of San Luis Obispo

Applications for 3 storefront retail businesses and an indefinite number of delivery-only retail businesses are open on the city website through January 29th.


City of Vista

Per the ordinance released in December, the city will be granting 3 delivery-only (non-storefront) retail licenses this year.

Asylum Seekers' Stories From the DHS "Ice Box"

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on January 4, 2019

Last week, Senator Dianne Feinstein called for a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the Department of Homeland Security’s detention practices. In December, two children who were detained for attempting to cross the US border died while in government custody. As the department overseeing the Border Patrol and Customs and Border Protection, the DHS has faced intense scrutiny for its role in these deaths, as well as for the practice of child detention in general. In particular, United Nations human rights experts are investigating whether the children were being held in a type of cell known as a hielera, or “ice box.” These cells are notorious for poor conditions that reportedly include low temperatures, overcrowding, and little access to food or water. The following are accounts from other individuals who have been detained while seeking asylum, as told to attorney Jennie Stepanian.

Contra Costa Cannabis Update

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on January 2, 2019

In November, a measure to tax and regulate cannabis businesses in Contra Costa County was approved by more than 72 percent of the county’s voters. Given that the election indicated overwhelming local approval for legal cannabis, the county has been moving toward finalizing its cannabis regulations, focusing on the county’s land use restrictions for cannabis businesses and its application process for potential cannabis operators. In December, the county’s Board of Supervisors met to discuss these issues in an open hearing. As of January, here’s where the county stands on the two matters.

Land Use Restrictions

Contra Costa currently plans to limit the number of permits granted for certain commercial cannabis activities. The proposed restrictions are as follows:

  • 4 Permits for Storefront Retail

  • 10 Permits for Cultivation

  • 2 Permits for Manufacturing in Agricultural Zoning Districts

The county has provided an interactive online map allowing prospective applicants to look up a property in order to determine its eligibility for a given cannabis activity, as well as which permits will be required to do business.

A complete list of permits that may be required for a specific property/activity, including health and water use requirements, can be found on the county’s Commercial Cannabis Permitting website.

Application Process

The Contra Costa Board of Supervisors released a preliminary draft of the county’s Request for Proposals (RFP) form. Designed as an invitation for cannabis business applicants, the RFP lays out the Contra Costa cannabis licensing process for the numerically-limited activities listed above.

First, applicants will submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) containing the basic information about their proposed business. The LOIs will be reviewed by the county, which will invite some businesses to submit full proposals. These proposals will make up the main part of the application, including complete descriptions of the prospective operation and the applicant’s qualifications.

Once an applicant’s proposal has been reviewed and selected by the county, the business will be eligible for a Land Use Permit for their commercial cannabis activity. Permits for non-numerically-limited commercial cannabis activities, on the other hand, can be applied through directly through the county’s Land Use Permit process, without the added LOI/RFP requirement.

The county currently plans to release its final RFP form on January 24, with LOIs due by February 14, proposals due by April 18, and permit eligibility granted in June/July. However, the terms of the RFP, including these estimated dates, are still subject to change. The application process, including the RFP, will be revised and brought before the Board of Supervisors again on January 22.

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This blog is not intended as legal advice and should not be taken as such. The possession, use, and/or sale of marijuana is illegal under federal law.