Cannabis CBD v. THC

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on March 22, 2018

The cannabis plant contains over 480 elements. Two of them being THC and CBD. Both are ubiquitous in modern day cannabis products, with different benefits and side-effects to each.

Ask A Cannabis Lawyer – Are Edibles Legal Under The MAUCRSA?

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on July 11, 2017

Reflecting the fact that cannabis edibles have become an increasingly popular alternative to smoking marijuana, California's MAUCRSA introduces new regulations on edible cannabis manufacturing. Cannabis manufacturers must take heed of these new limits and regulations to ensure that their products are not only within compliance, but also effective and safe for human consumption.

The MAUCRSA defines an “edible cannabis product” as manufactured cannabis intended for human consumption, either in whole or in part. “Manufacturing” of cannabis is the production, preparation, propagation or compounding of cannabis products. This includes the extraction and infusion processes, packaging, repackaging, labeling and relabeling of manufactured medical cannabis or cannabis products.

According to theLEAFonline, many other forms of manufactured cannabis, including tinctures, have a maximum of up to 1,000 mg of THC. However, under the proposed regulations, edible cannabis products will only be allowed to contain 10 mg of THC per serving, with the finished product capping no more than 100 mg of THC per package. This caution speaks to a key concern about edible cannabis: consistency.

Due to its being absorbed through the stomach rather than the lungs, edible cannabis doesn't usually reach its full potency for at least an hour after consumption. When combined with inconsistent labeling, this makes edibles easy to consume to excess before their full effects are felt. As WikiLeaf writes, this may cause side effects like anxiety, paranoia, cottonmouth, and lethargy. Nevertheless, these effects often differ from person to person, depending on factors such as the frequency of use, size and weight of the user, and whether the edibles are taken on an empty stomach. Consistent dosage helps to prevent these possible adverse effects. For this reason, edible products that contain more than a single serving must be recorded, defined, or otherwise marked to indicate how many servings they contain. 

Under the MAUCRSA, manufacturers would be required to take reasonable measures to ensure that their products successfully communicate:

  • How many milligrams of THC are in each serving

  • What the recommended dosage would be based on specific criteria, such as weight, size, etc.

  • What, if any, side effects may occur if taken in excess

With these THC dosage limits in place, a consumer can easily understand how many servings are needed to achieve their desired results without any side effects.

The proposed regulations have also stated that edible cannabis products cannot contain any infused alcoholic beverages, nor any non-cannabinoid additives such as caffeine and nicotine. This is to ensure that these additives don't combine to increase the potency, addictive potential, or toxicity of cannabis edibles.

The MAUCRSA is vague, however, in determining whether natural caffeine is permissible; some caffeinated edible cannabis products, such as tea to alleviate pain and insomnia, are currently available for medical use, but it's unclear what their status would be under the new regulations. Manufacturers may bear the greater burden when it comes to remanufacturing their products to comply with state law.

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This blog is not intended as legal advice and should not be taken as such. The possession, use, and/or sale of marijuana is illegal under federal law.