Additional State Licensing Requirements and Permits

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on October 2, 2018

Getting a commercial cannabis license in California is complicated enough when coordinating your proposed business activities with a variety of government agencies. Depending on what activity (or activities) your business plans to conduct, every commercial cannabis license will ultimately be processed by one of three state agencies: the Bureau of Cannabis Control (BCC), the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) or the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). In addition to applying through these departments, your business may need permission from regulatory agencies that manage peripheral elements of the cannabis industry. This may include attaining water permits, landscaping protocols, motor carrier permits, and certification of processing equipment. This will, however, depend on what activities your business seeks to engage in, and will require due diligence and -in many cases - subcontract work. All license applications require the business to register for a seller’s permit with the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA). Every applicant must also comply with the Department of Toxic Substances Control’s database, known as EnviroStor, which tracks cleanup, permitting, enforcement, and investigation efforts at hazardous waste facilities and sites with known or suspected contamination issues. The other type of compliance required for all activities is through the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), which is primarily enforced by the Bureau of Cannabis Control. However, CEQA compliance was recently resolved for all licensees in an Environmental Impact Report.

Breaking news: California releases emergency cannabis regulations

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on November 16, 2017

Today, California’s three state cannabis licensing authorities released proposed emergency licensing regulations for commercial medicinal and adult-use cannabis. The regulations are intended to reflect the law that was set out in California’s Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA), and will replace the draft regulations that were released for cannabis cultivation, manufacturing, retail and other activities in April 2017 (you can read more about the prior regulations in our post here).  These regulations will allow the state to start issuing temporary licenses to conduct commercial cannabis activities on January 1. Our San Francisco and Los Angeles cannabis attorneys are analyzing the new regulations and comparing them to the previous draft and we will do a more in depth post on what has changed very soon. 

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This blog is not intended as legal advice and should not be taken as such. The possession, use, and/or sale of marijuana is illegal under federal law.