How Many Los Angeles Cannabis Licenses Will Be Issued?

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on November 7, 2017

Last week, our Los Angeles cannabis attorneys were at the City Council meeting where the Council moved to amend the Draft Regulations that were previously released on September 22, 2017. The Los Angeles City Council moved to amend the Draft Regulations released on 9-22-2017 to include a motion that will allow cannabis operators who meet certain requirements to remain open if they file for limited immunity within 15 days of applications opening. You can read more about the Draft Regulations from September in our previous posts here and here.

Ask an LA Cannabis Attorney...at the Freedom of Info Sesh

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on October 26, 2017

Thanks to everyone who came to our first Freedom of Information session about Los Angeles Cannabis Licensing!

Los Angeles Cannabis Community At the Infused Expo this Weekend

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on October 22, 2017

This weekend was the second annual The Edibles List Infused Expo in DTLA. As LA Cannabis lawyers, our firm is tracking the City's development of regulations and also California's. This weekend, the focus was on edibles.

California Dept. of Food & Agriculture Releases Cannabis Cultivation Checklist

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on October 20, 2017

As California prepares to start issuing cannabis cultivation licenses on January 1, 2018, the state is becoming more transparent regarding the exact requirements for legal cultivation under the new regulatory regime. Our cannabis lawyers are often asked how you can prepare for licensing - here is your answer. The California Department of Food & Agriculture’s just released a full checklist of requirements for the Cal. Cannabis cultivation application, now available in .pdf form on their website.

 

These requirements represent an important shift in the state’s attitude when it comes to cannabis cultivation – in particular, the checklist shows that California plans for far more robust cooperation between state and local regulatory authorities than has existed in the past. As Merry Jane writes in an article about the checklist, “Unlike the current cat and mouse games canna-businesses play with local municipalities under the wild west rules of Prop 215, California’s new system will see increased coordination between state and local governing bodies by requiring licenses for cannabis operations at both levels.” Our Los Angeles cannabis attorneys have witnessed both the wild west and the implementation of the new system as cities and counties around California issue their own permits and licenses. 

This two-level licensing structure also means that the process of applying for a cultivation license will be an arduous one, with applicants required to jump through a long series of bureaucratic hoops in order to attain legal status. The full State requirements, as listed in the checklist, are as follows:

  • An existing local cultivation permit (optional, but recommended)
  • Proof of the applicant’s right to occupy the property used for cultivation
  • Business formation documents filed by the California Secretary of State’s office
  • California State Water Resources Control Board permits and verification of water source
  • California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s 1602 permit or a waiver
  • California Department of Toxic Substance’s hazardous materials record search via their EnviroStor data-management system
  • California Department of Fee and Tax Administration’s seller’s permit
  • Labor peace agreement (for operations that will employ more than 20 people)
  • Surety bond valued at $5,000
  • California Department of Justice fingerprinting via its Live Scan service

The checklist also includes a list of local permits that may be required, including those issued by the municipality’s Building Department, Public Works Department, and Sheriff’s Office. The takeaway is clear; while Jan 1, 2018, may seem very soon to aspiring cannabusiness owners, getting a legal license to cultivate cannabis won’t be possible without a lot of paperwork.

Ask a Cannabis Lawyer – Free Seminar Series @ Hitman Coffee

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on October 12, 2017
 

Ask an LA Cannabis Attorney: How Can I Prepare for Cannabis Licensing?

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on October 6, 2017

While there has been much debate over LA’s recent Draft Regulations, not much has been stated clearly about how to prepare for the LA license application process. You can read more about the draft regulations here, here, and here. Below is some guidance from our Los Angeles Cannabis Attorneys. As you know from our previous posts on SB 94,  you will need City or County authorization in order to apply for a State License. The areas you can start preparing for fall into a few main categories: real estate, taxes, corporate documents and financial planning.

Under New City Regulations, Will LA’s Marijuana Businesses Be Able To Stay Open?

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on September 27, 2017

This past Monday, the Los Angeles City Council held an open meeting of its Rules, Elections, and Intergovernmental Relations Committee on the subject of the city’s cannabis regulations. Our LA cannabis lawyers were present to comment on the new draft and urge the City to take a reasonable, fair, and business-oriented approach to regulation. To the disappointment of many of Los Angeles' cannabis stakeholders, the city has not yet drafted its final cannabis ordinance, and has yet to even set a date for the completion of said ordinance. Though under Measure M this was supposed to pass by September 30, that deadline is about to come and go.

As the LA Times reported, the current situation and the new draft regulations leave the city’s existing marijuana businesses (particularly existing cultivators and manufacturers) in a precarious situation. Without a clear path toward legally sanctioned operations under the new cannabis ordinance, their businesses could be forced to shut down to avoid violating the law. Beyond the obvious financial hardship, inconvenience, and legal risk, this unclear state of affairs for marijuana activity presents a business hazard: With real estate prices in Los Angeles at record levels, a property that’s zoned for cannabis activity, but not allowed to operate, can quickly become a white elephant with overhead expenses large enough to drive its owner out of business.

Council members responded to the concerns of those in attendance, saying that, although they had not made an official recommendation to the city on how to proceed, they hoped to find a solution that satisfied the existing industry’s needs. Politically, the situation is a difficult one: While it makes sense to give marijuana operators priority in licensing commensurate with their compliance with previous laws, detractors argue that this could be interpreted as rewarding grey-market or outright illegal activity. Either way, some constituents are bound to be unhappy. Moreover, the situation is characterized by pervasive uncertainty: this regulation is still a draft, and there could be still more changes on the way before a final ordinance is passed.

For Los Angeles to pave the way for a sustainable legal cannabis industry, the council members will have to respond to these concerns – and do so quickly, before the uncertainty of the current situation takes its toll on existing cannabis businesses.  

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This blog is not intended as legal advice and should not be taken as such. The possession, use, and/or sale of marijuana is illegal under federal law.