What's the 411 on 420 and "Undue Concentration?"

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on July 3, 2019

Recently, rumors and misinformation have circulated surrounding LA’s “undue concentration” rules for commercial cannabis licensing. The undue concentration rules have not been eliminated, as some have falsely claimed. LA has recently changed details about the policy, in a way that will allow more retail dispensary licenses to be issued sooner. Some have feared, however, that the latest changes may introduce an element of unfairness to the licensing process.

LA Phase 3 Major Updates

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on May 2, 2019

NEW PHASE 3 LEGISLATION APPROVED BY CITY COUNCIL

On April 30th, the Los Angeles City Council approved new legislation to begin the third and final Phase of cannabis licensing within the City of Los Angeles no later than the end of next month.

Phase 3 will include two rounds of applications for Storefront Retailer Licenses in addition to one round of applications for Non-Storefront (i.e., Delivery) Retailer Licenses.

Priority will be given to Tier 1 and Tier 2 Social Equity Applicants for all three rounds. Additionally, each round will operate on a first-in-time rule. In other words, the first application submitted will be given priority over succeeding applications with premises within 700 feet of the property. Licenses will be issued on a first-come-first-serve basis.

 

 

 

PHASE 3: ROUND 1, ROUND 2, & DELIVERY PILOT PROGRAM

The upcoming Phase of cannabis licensing will give priority to applicants under the Social Equity Program, a program designed to provide reparations to individuals who have been disproportionally impacted by the war on drugs. Social Equity Applicants will receive expedited application review among other benefits through the program. Eligible applicants in the program will be classified as either Tier 1 or Tier 2 applicants, depending on the criteria they meet. To qualify for Tier 1 or Tier 2 Applicant status, individuals must have lived in a Disproportionately Impacted Area (DIA) for a minimum amount of time and cannot own an Existing Medical Marijuana Business (EMMB). The City of Los Angeles has listed a set of zip codes that currently qualify as DIAs. The City announced that it may add additional zip codes to this list in the future.

ROUND 1 (STOREFRONT RETAIL LICENSING)

After all Tier 1 and Tier 2 Applicants have been verified and notified by the DCR, the DCR will begin accepting applications for Round 1 of Phase 3. Only verified Tier 1 or Tier 2 Social Equity Applicants will be eligible to submit an application during Round 1. Applicants must submit all required documents (see table) within a 14-day period to be announced by the DCR. The dates of the 14-day period have not yet been identified, but the City Council has ordered the DCR to begin this period no later than September 3, 2019. The DCR will distribute 100 licenses during Round 1 to the first 75 eligible Tier 1 Applicants and the first 25 eligible Tier 2 Applicants. Verified Tier 1 or Tier 2 Applicants can only apply for one license during Round 1.

ROUND 2 (STOREFRONT RETAIL LICENSING)

Following the 14-day period of Round 1, the DCR will host a second round of Storefront Retail License application processing. Round 2 will only accept applications from verified Tier 1 and Tier 2 Applicants, just as in Round 1. For the second round of application processing, the DCR will accept applications during a 30-day period that has yet to be determined. Specific documents will be due within the 30-day application period, while all additional documents will be due within 90 days (see table). The first 150 eligible applicants will be issued licenses. The DCR may issue additional licenses until each Community Plan Area (CPA) has reached Undue Concentration. Tier 1 or Tier 2 Applicants who were issued a license during Round 1 may not apply for a license in Round 2. 

DELIVERY PILOT PROGRAM (NON-STOREFRONT RETAIL LICENSING)

The DCR has announced that it will launch a Delivery Pilot Program, where it will issue Non-Storefront Retail (i.e., Delivery) Licenses to the first 60 eligible applicants. The Delivery Pilot Program will accept applications from verified Tier 1 and Tier 2 Applicants as well as General Applicants. The DCR announced that delivery will be restricted to addresses within City limits unless special permission is granted by the DCR. 

 

 

 

  

PRE-VETTING PROCESS FOR SOCIAL EQUITY APPLICANTS

Applicants that qualify as Tier 1 or Tier 2 Social Equity Applicants must submit a preliminary application along with supporting documents to the Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR) in order to have their Tier 1 or 2 status verified. The Ordinance voted into law yesterday identifies an unspecified 60-day period in which these preliminary applications will be received. Although the exact dates of the application window have yet to be determined, the City Council approved a motion ordering that the 60-day period begin no later than May 28, 2019. The DCR will not accept applications or supporting documents after the 60-day period. After the 60-day period ends, the DCR will determine whether or not applicants are verified as Tier 1 or Tier 2 applicants and notify all applicants of their final, non-appealable decision prior to the beginning of the Phase 3 Round 1 application window.

 

 

Cracking Down on Compliance

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on April 30, 2019

     

     Operational compliance has become paramount to the success of many cannabis businesses following new state regulations that went into effect earlier this year.  For others, non-compliance has been a great downfall. Following the legalization of commercial cannabis, the state of California hastily drafted and passed emergency regulations which outlined licensing and operational requirements for cannabis businesses under the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA). These emergency regulations went into effect in December of 2017 to provide a temporary solution for the lack of cannabis legislation until more thorough regulations could be drafted and adopted by state agencies. Just three months ago, the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) approved new regulations which were immediately adopted by all three state licensing agencies. The new regulations include many significant changes from the previous emergency regulations and introduce more restrictive guidelines for cannabis businesses. Further, the new regulations define serious implications for businesses who violate the new guidelines – from fines up to $250,000 to loss of licensure. In recent months, a rapid number of compliance enforcement agencies have emerged at both the local and state level. Licensed cannabis businesses in California have experienced a peak in random compliance inspection visits, raids from local and state law enforcement, and seizure of cannabis products. With the commercial cannabis industry now in full effect, local and state agencies are beginning to focus less on setting the framework for the industry and more on enforcement of regulations.

A majority of licensed cannabis businesses are in some way in violation of current regulations despite their intentional efforts to comply. This is largely due to the cumbersome location-dependent nature of cannabis regulations. Although cannabis is legal in the state of California, commercial cannabis businesses are still federally illegal, and there is no federal legislation governing the licensing and operational compliance of cannabis businesses. As a result, cannabis regulations vary between states. Further convoluting the concept of cannabis compliance, regulations also vary within-state and are dependent on legislation issued by local authorities. All California cannabis businesses must adhere to statewide regulations enforced by the three state agencies – the Bureau of Cannabis Control (BCC), the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), and the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA)  – in addition to guidelines enforced by local agencies. For instance, outdoor cultivation is legal at the state level per the CDFA, but it is prohibited within the City of Los Angeles per the local Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR). Cannabis businesses must also comply with local Fire Department safety codes which also vary by jurisdiction.

With compliance enforcement on the rise, it is crucial for all cannabis businesses to stay informed about both state and local regulations in order to avoid high penalties or business closure.  Our firm offers full-coverage compliance counseling to licensed cannabis businesses. Our team is in regular attendance of local city hall and county government meetings pertaining to commercial cannabis in all areas of California and maintains current knowledge of the ever-changing regulations. We provide counsel in all areas of business compliance for cannabis retailers, distributors, cultivators, and microbusinesses. Our attorneys have a combined 20+ years of experience in the commercial cannabis industry and are active in compliance consulting throughout the state. We are able to provide our clients with expert contractors in building safety code pre-inspection, packaging and labeling compliance, product inventory and storage, advertisement restrictions, etc. We would love to help ensure that your cannabis business is successful and in compliance with all local and state regulations, giving you one less thing to worry about. If you have any questions or would like to speak with our attorneys to further discuss our compliance services, please feel free to reach us via email (info@margolinlawrence.com) or phone (323-253-9700). 

L.A. Retail Cannabis Legislation Moves Forward: What Happens Now

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on April 22, 2019

 

 

Wednesday, April 17 - The City of Los Angeles Rules, Elections, and Intergovernmental Relations Committee discussed and approved an April 12, 2019 report and proposed ordinance from the LA City Attorney regarding cannabis licensing, with recommendations to make some amendments.

All recommendations were approved and will be redrafted for Council consideration and presented on Tuesday, April 30.

Today’s meeting moves the City closer to the opening of the highly anticipated Phase 3, which is the first chance that will allow the general public to receive dispensary licenses. The City Attorney was directed to make requested changes to the proposed new ordinance, to present for City Council consideration on April 30.

 

Notable Takeaways from Wednesday’s Meeting

The City of Los Angeles and the DCR have been hard at work in recent months, particularly as they sort through the specifics of Phase 3. While Phases 1 and 2 focused on existing cannabis dispensaries, non-retailers (i.e. growers and manufacturers), and social equity applicants, Phase 3 has been the main attraction for many entrepreneurs and would-be business owners looking to break into the industry.

In an earlier April meeting, the fate of Phase 3 was largely unknown due to funding. The DCR claimed that licensing was on hold as they awaited the Fee Deferral Program, which would allow Phase 3 to commence.

While a date has not been announced for the opening of Phase 3 applications, Wednesday’s meeting shed some light as to the direction the City and DCR are taking to solidify the process.

 

Among the notable new details that are coming out through these recent meetings and reports are:

● Changes to the Los Angeles Municipal Code establishing a first come, first served application process for retailer commercial cannabis activity licenses, with details regarding what is required for an application to be considered complete

● A proposal to allow applications for retail storefront dispensaries beginning January 1, 2020, in neighborhoods that have already exceeded Undue Concentration caps, with City Council approval

● Modifications to the process for issuing non-storefront retail licenses

● Allowing the Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR) to grant Temporary Approval to Phase 3 storefront retail applicants

● Exempting Phase 2 applicants from the Undue Concentration requirements

● Setting deadlines for Phase 2 applicants to finalize their business location (May 15) and obtain Temporary Approval (substantial progress by July 1)

● Revising various requirements to qualify as a Tier 3 Social Equity Applicant and revising various benefits provided to Tier 1 and Tier 2 Social Equity Applicants

● Adding an additional reason to deny a license application — if the City has taken enforcement action against unlicensed cannabis activity at the same address since January 2018

● Clarifying the definition of license ownership relative to management companies

 

In addition, one of the recommendations to the draft ordinance that was approved on Wednesday was to instruct the DCR to finalize a timeline for all Phase 3 and Type 9 Pilot activities and post the information on the Department’s website. This indicates that an exact date for Phase 3 licensing could be established by April 30, if not sooner.

 

DCR Prepares to Open Phase 3 Applications

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on April 2, 2019

An Important Step Forward for Los Angeles Cannabis Licensing – DCR Prepares to Open Phase 3 Applications, Starting with Retail for Social Equity Applicants

 Cannabis licensing has been on the lips of hundreds of interested Los Angeles retailers and users for months.  Important steps were taken to move the process forward at yesterday’s meeting of the Los Angeles Budget and Finance Committee at City Hall.  During the meeting on April 1, City reps discussed delays in the licensing due to the delayed funding for the social equity program. It was also revealed that many people in LA have been holding properties for months waiting for the license application process to open up.

In order to continue with the licensing process, based on the specifics of the LA ordinance, the City of Los Angeles needs to issue a set number of retail dispensary licenses to social equity applicants (defined so that people may qualify based on low-income status, having a prior cannabis arrest, and/or living in specified zip codes within the City for at least 5 or 10 years that have had the most cannabis arrests). 

For several months, interested parties have been awaiting the opening of “Phase 3” of Los Angeles’s cannabis licensing program, which is the first opportunity for members the general public to apply for cannabis licenses in the City.  The previous two phases awarded licenses to certain qualified “priority” retail and non-retail businesses who had been operating in the City since before 2016. 

The City is required to issue retail dispensary licenses to social equity applicants on a 2:1 ratio as compared to non-social equity applicants.  To date, the City has issued 178 Phase 1 retail (non-social equity) applications, meaning that it needs to issue 356 social equity licenses in order to catch up with the required ratio.  To start reaching these numbers, the City has proposed issuing 200 licenses (in two batches of 100) to social equity applicants.

This process has been delayed because, under the City’s law, social equity applicants are entitled to receive certain business licensing and compliance assistance, but so far there have been no funds allotted to provide this assistance.  At yesterday’s meeting, the Budget and Finance Committee finally approved funding for the social equity program, meaning the whole licensing process can now move forward.

DCR’s New Tool to Aid Prospective Phase 3 Retail Applicants in Their Property Search & State to Issue Provisional Licenses to Qualified Temporary License Holders

Posted by Zachary Tucker on March 29, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF CANNABIS REGULATION’S NEW INTERACTIVE MAP

The Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR), the governing agency regulating commercial cannabis activities for the City of Los Angeles, released a new interactive map this week which highlights the number of retail licenses available for applications in each of the 35 Community Plan Areas in the City. The map shows the maximum number of retail licenses approved (i.e., “license capacity”) for each Community Plan Area as well as how many of those licenses are available or otherwise occupied by retailers currently in operation.

The interactive map will be particularly useful for prospective applicants who want to pursue a dispensary license during the next and final round of licensing for the City and need to identify eligible properties for a potential retail location. Many retail licenses have already been distributed which has greatly limited the number of remaining licenses available for application in each Community Plan Area. The limited number of vacant licenses has further complicated the property search process for prospective applicants -- a process already restricted by distance and sensitive use requirements defined by the Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC). LAMC mandates that all retail locations be at least 700’ away from other licensed cannabis retailers and other “sensitive use” properties (e.g., public parks, public libraries). Further, it restricts the location of potential retail establishments to nine zones as defined by the City’s planning website through Zimas.

Eligible Zones for Cannabis Retail Locations as Defined by The LA Department of City Planning:

  • C1 Limited Commercial Zone

  • C1.5 Limited Commercial Zone

  • C2 Commercial Zone

  • C4 Commercial Zone

  • C5 Commercial Zone

  • CM Commercial Manufacturing Zone

  • M1 Limited Industrial Zone

  • M2 Light Industrial Zone

  • M3 Heavy Industrial Zone


 

STATE TO ISSUE PROVISIONAL LICENSES BEFORE EXPIRATION OF TEMPORARY LICENSES

Today, the Bureau of Cannabis Control, California Department of Public Health, and California Department of Food and Agriculture announced a plan to prevent lapses in licensure for retailers who have active temporary commercial cannabis licenses that will soon expire. The three licensing agencies are tracking the expiration dates of all active temporary licenses and intend to issue a provisional license to eligible retailers who currently have a temporary license prior to its expiration. To qualify for a provisional license, applicants must:

(1) Hold or have held a temporary license for the same premises and the same commercial cannabis activity for which the provisional license will be issued; and

(2) Have submitted a completed license application to the licensing authority, which must include a document or statement indicating that California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) compliance is underway.

In today’s announcement, the three licensing agencies urged that any temporary license holders who are contacted by their state licensing authority reply promptly in order to avoid a lapse in licensure.

Los Angeles Cannabis Regulations Commission Announces Recommendations for Phase 3 Processing

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on March 11, 2019

The Cannabis Regulations Commission met on March 5th and presented their recommendations to the City Attorney that would establish policies for processing phase 3 applications. Phase 3 would begin with a 60-day pre-vetting process of social equity applicants to verify Tier 1 or Tier 2 qualification. Verified Tier 1 or 2 applicants will then be eligible to move forward into the first phase of the licensing process. The DCR will issue 100 licenses in this initial phase allocating 75 to qualified Tier 1 applicants. Qualified Tier 1 applicants would receive priority receiving 75% of the available licenses during this initial phase so long as all basic application requirements are met including:

 

  • A signed lease with proof of payment or deposit, or a property deed
  • Meet all sensitive use requirements, including undue concentration
  • Payment of required license fees
  • Ownership organizational structure
  • Financial information
  • Proposed staffing plan
  • Indemnification
  • Complete and detailed diagram
  • Proposed security plan
  • Radius map
  • Labor peace agreement
  • Current Certificate of Occupancy
  • Compliance with the Equity Share Rules

 

Second phase 

The second phase will allocate an additional 100 licenses establishing no priority between Tier 1 or Tier 2 applicants. The second phase will establish a “first-come, first-serve” process that will allow the first 100 qualified applicants will move forward. Basic qualifications required to be met are payment of the required license fees or deferment approval; ownership organizational structure; financial information; indemnification; and, labor peace agreement. The remaining qualifications mentioned above would be required within 90 days.

 

The Commission also recommended the implementation of a pilot program for Type 9 Retail Non-Storefront delivery services. A total of 40 licenses would be available allocating 20 licenses to pre-vetted Tier 1 Social Equity applicants. The pilot program will also allow verified applicants who could not obtain a Type 10 retail license due to undue concentration limits will receive priority for a Type 9 delivery license. This will allow licensees to remain in their building and operate as a non-storefront retailer in lieu of having to locate and secure another compliant location. Eligible phase 2 applicants will also have an opportunity to amend their application to include delivery so long as they are compliant with the city’s zoning and regulatory requirements.

Phase 3 Licensing Estimated Timeline


 

Phase 3 Application Processing

60 day Pre-Vetting Period

  • Basic Tier 1 or Tier 2 qualification
  • Indemnification

 

 Phase 3A:

14 day application window

  • Qualified Tier 1 or Tier 2 applicants will be processed for 100 retail licenses (75% reserved for Tier 1 applicants). Pre-vetted applicants will receive 15 days notice of when the first phase application window is to open.
  • Deficient applications will have 5 days from the start of their application to rectify insufficiencies or issues with the basic qualifications.

 

 Phase 3B:

30 day application window

  • Pre-vetted Tier 1 or Tier 2 applicants who meet basic qualifications (see above) on a “first-come, first-serve” basis.
  • Applicants will have an additional 90 days to submit the remaining application requirements
  • Deficient applications will have 5 days from the start of their application to rectify insufficiencies or issues with the basic qualifications

 Delivery Pilot Program:

  • Pre-vetted Tier 1 or Tier 2 applicants will receive 15 days notice for when Type 9 delivery licenses will become available
  • Pre-vetted Tier 1 or Tier 2 applicants subjected to undue concentration limits will have priority
  • Eligible phase 2 applicants will have opportunity to amend their application to include delivery
  • Deficient applications will have 5 days from the start of their application to rectify insufficiencies or issues with the basic qualifications

LA Cannabis Update: New Recommendations from the Los Angeles Department of Cannabis Regulation

Posted by Raza Lawrence on February 15, 2019

Cannabis attorney Raza Lawrence attended today’s special meeting of the Los Angeles Rules, Elections, and Intergovernmental Relations Committee. At the meeting, the discussion focused on three main points:

  • The City of LA is considering and discussing different possible ways to process Phase 3 applications, including a first-come first-served method, a lottery, a “merit-based” system, or some combination of these three methods.

  • It’s possible that the city will lower the percentage of a Tier 1 or Tier 2 social equity business that is required to be owned by the individual who satisfies the social equity criteria.

  • The DCR’s lack of funding, and the need for more funds in order to move forward and process all the applications from Phases 1, 2, and 3.

The current situation with regard to cannabis retail is tense – the city has considered cracking down on non-compliant businesses by shutting off their water and power, among other methods.

To help streamline the city's regulations and ameliorate the pressure that cannabis businesses currently face, the DCR released a report including a set of recommended amendments to the city’s cannabis procedures. The recommendations, as filed with the city, are as follows:

1. REQUEST the City Attorney, with the assistance of the Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR), to prepare and present an ordinance to amend Section 104 of Article 4 of Chapter X of the Los Angeles Municipal Code and the Rules and Regulations as necessary to:

a. Modify the definition of “owner” in conformance with state regulations, including clarifying that the meaning of “owner” does not apply to the managers, officers, directors, and equity-holders of the management company.

b. Allow DCR to grant Temporary Approval to a Phase 3 storefront retail license applicant after DCR recommends that the Commission issue the applicant a license.

c. Amend “Program Site Specific Conditions” from the Social Equity Applicant to allow for site specific conditions only as required by CEQA, public health and safety, or as necessary under a DCR, State of California, or City enforcement action in conformance with other sections of the rules and regulations.

d. Eliminate a Tier 2 applicant’s obligation to provide business, licensing, and compliance support to a Tier 1 applicant.

e. Require Tier 3 applicants with Temporary Approval to enter into a Social Equity Agreement within 60 days of the enactment of this ordinance or from the time of application, whichever is later.

f. Allow DCR to issue non-storefront retail licenses in the manner provided in LAMC Sec. 104.06(b) and exempt non-storefront retail license applicants from the community meeting requirement in LAMC Sec. 104.04.

g. Clarify that DCR may require an applicant to submit additional information documents after DCR deems an application complete as necessary to make a licensing decision.

h. Remove the requirement in Regulation No. 10 D. 4. that a retailer store all cannabis goods in a vault or safe during non-retail hours.

i. Revise Regulation No. 7 to provide that DCR shall process applications for licenses in a manner consistent with LAMC Section 104 and these Rules and Regulations.

j. Conform the City’s delivery regulations with state regulations with respect to operational requirements.

K. Allow DCR to enter into Social Equity Agreements with a Tier 3 applicant without Commission approval.

l. Clarify LAMC Section 104.20(i)(9) to state that after the term of a Social Equity Agreement is completed, a Tier 1 or Tier 2 Social Equity Applicant license holder may only transfer control or ownership of a License after first providing the other ownership interests in the business the right of first refusal to buy, at market-rate.

m. Clarify the definition of limited access areas to only include those areas required under the rules and regulations of the State of California.

n. Clarify that any applicant or landowner with evidence against them with respect to illegal cannabis activity at any time since January 1, 2018 will be banned from participation in Phase 3 retail and delivery processing.

2. INSTRUCT the DCR to report back at the next Rules, Elections, and Intergovernmental Relations Committee meeting with a further analysis of the recommendations for Phase 3 Storefront Retail processing and Non-storefront Retail processing, including consideration of a social equity applicant registry platform similar to the City of San Francisco.

3. INSTRUCT the DCR to suspend any Phase 3 processing until the enhanced Social Equity analysis for the San Fernando Valley, Boyle Heights, and Downtown Los Angeles is completed.

4. INSTRUCT the DCR to provide an updated map online within two weeks oft he Council action with respect to the current locations of all Phase 1 and Phase 2 applicants that have received local authorization, temporary approval, or any form of local and state licensure. This shall also include an online document with respect to undue concentration areas by community planning areas, and the capacity left for Phase 3 applicants.

5. INSTRUCT the Department of City Planning (DCP) to include amending the pending draft ordinances pertaining to cannabis in conformance with state regulations with respect to alleyway access, ingress, egress, and door location.

6. INSTRUCT the DCP to include amendments to the pending draft ordinances pertaining to cannabis in a similar manner to the City of Seattle, Washington in which two retail establishments may co-locate within 1,000 feet of each other, and the next retail establishment must be 1,000 feet away from both retail establishments.

7. INSTRUCT the City Clerk to hold Council File No. 14-0366-S5 open and active, including the DCR report on file, for further deliberations by the Rules, Elections, and Intergovernmental Relations Committee.

Everything You Need to Know from the Pasadena Application Workshop

Posted by Raza Lawrence on November 14, 2018
On Tuesday   night, the city of Pasadena hosted a presentation on cannabis licensing with a planning consultant. Here is what we learned from the meeting.  
 
Regulations for cannabis businesses were voted in on   June 5th  by Pasadena voters. As a pragmatic and conservative city, Pasadena's licensing focuses on exercise of local control – with the aim of protecting its residents from secondary effects through land use regulation. 
 
The application period is from   January 1st to January 31st at   11:59 p.m.  There will be a notice of the 30-day period on   December 14th. Currently there is a draft of the review criteria available. The final criteria will be released on   December 14th.  
 
The whole application, as well as payments, may be submitted electronically. Pasadena's selection committee will not give special weight to applications submitted on   January 1st  versus   January 31st, and will not look at anything until the application window closes. The application fee will be approximately $10,000 per category. 
 
The application requires qualifications of the operator, cover letter, business plan, background, experience dealing with government agencies, neighborhood compatibility and enhancement, and security plan. The limit is 50 pages of text and images. You do not have to have a confirmed site in order to apply. 
 
When the application portal closes, there will be an initial screening of applications - did the applicant answer all questions? is the application in full compliance? - to ensure the application is complete and responsive. 
 
Once applications are scored, top applicants will be notified and will have the  opportunity to go forward and secure land use permits and public  health permits – this is period when you need to lock down your sites,  look at buffer zones, and so on.  These sites must also be located at least 1,000 feet from  any other cannabis retailer.
 
All the scoring will be based on written submissions, but the city reserves the right to start an interview process of the final applicants. 
 
Pasadena will allow up to 6 retail permits in the city, one per council district, so long as they meet the required separation from schools, parks, and residential properties. 
 
Another point about delivery: people with licenses in other cities are allowed to deliver in Pasadena. Pasadena will not have separate delivery licenses, but the retail licenses will allow both storefront and delivery. 
 
Pasadena will allow up to 4 cultivation sites in the city, indoor only. These cultivation sites must be in commercial general and industrial general zones. 
Pasadena will also allow 4 testing laboratories in the city where other medical labs are allowed. 
 
For more information from the workshop, see the handouts at the City of Pasadena website. These include details of the proposed scoring system. 
 

New Cannabis Legislation

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on October 1, 2018

Allison Margolin, founder and partner of Margolin & Lawrence, spoke on Wednesday about dosing regulations at the State of Cannabis conference in Queen Mary, Long Beach. The maximum dosage is 100 mg of THC for packaged edible products, and each serving can contain no more than 10 mg. This was established in the final re-adoption of the emergency regulations (CCR, Title 17, Division 1, Chapter 13, §40305), and while these limits may frustrate consumers with a higher tolerance, larger doses of concentrated cannabis products are allowed in non-edible forms. Under §40306 of the regulations, topical products, concentrates and other non-edible products (including tinctures and capsules) may be sold in amounts up to 1,000mg per package. a special recommendation to get a larger dose (up to 1,000mg) without medical prescription. Up to 2,000mg per package is also permitted under this provision, but only for medicinal-use customers and with appropriate labelling.

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This blog is not intended as legal advice and should not be taken as such. The possession, use, and/or sale of marijuana is illegal under federal law.