LA City Council Update: New Cannabis Rules in Development

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on March 6, 2018

As of this year, cannabis business is legal in Los Angeles, but the process of drafting and refining the laws and regulations that will actually govern the legal cannabis industry is still in its early stages.

To that end, over the past month, the LA city council met to adopt the following items:

  • Item #22: Prop D Dispensaries, MMD's, AUMA
  • Item #23: MAUCRSA, Prop D, Land Use, Preparation of Ordinance, AUMA
  • Item #24: New hires at the DCR, Cannabis Business Fees, Interim Position Authority
  • Item #25: Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act / State-Chartered Bank / Cannabis Banking Activities

While none of these items are extremely surprising in their own right, they may have significant consequences for the nature of Los Angeles’ cannabis industry.

For instance, Item #23 lays out a path to adjust the LA municipal code, adding “provisions to allow for the Cannabis Regulation Commission to make exceptions to the 600-foot school restriction for non-retail cannabis activities subject to a California Environmental Quality Act of 1970 analysis of environmental impacts and conditions to address public health, safety and welfare considerations, as well as a public hearing.” This means that buildings that were not in the correct zoning could be, if the City finds after the environmental analysis that there are not negative effects from having a cannabis cultivation or manufacturing operation near a school. A change to this rule would potentially mean that, as long as they were in keeping with public health and safety, cannabis businesses could be located in far more locations across LA. Note that under state law, local jurisdictions can allow for closer than 600 feet. 

Other ideas in these items may also have major impacts on the LA cannabis industry. For instance, Item #23 also provides for mixed-light cultivation and social consumption lounges, two activities that the city’s cannabis ordinances haven’t allowed in the past, while Item #25 expresses the city’s support for a State-chartered bank that would allow cannabis businesses to bank their money in California. Each of these changes would be a major step toward full legal legitimacy for marijuana in the Los Angeles area.

While these items are significant in their own right, they also reflect a trend of increasing acceptance of the cannabis industry in LA. Establishing regulations however,  is an ongoing process. For more information, check our guide to California cannabis business law or contact us at info@margolinlawrence.com to speak with one of our Los Angeles cannabis lawyers.

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Ask A Cannabis Trademark Lawyer: How Do I Apply For A State Trademark?

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on January 9, 2018

 As of January 1st, 2018, the long wait is over: cannabis business owners can apply for California state trademarks. The application form can be obtained here: http://bpd.cdn.sos.ca.gov/ts/forms/tm-100.pdf. Because cannabis is still federally illegal and cannabis products themselves cannot be trademarked, this is a viable avenue for many California cannabis brands that will protect your business marks within the state. You can read our prior post about USPTO Trademarks here.

According to the website for the Office of the California Secretary of State:

“Beginning January 1, 2018, customers may register their cannabis-related Trademark or Service Mark with the California Secretary of State's office so long as:

1.The mark is lawfully in use in commerce within California; and 

2.Matches the classification of goods and services adopted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office.  

If the application submitted to register a Trademark or Service Mark is found deficient, the application will be returned to the registrant for correction.

Note: Not all cannabis-related products can be registered under current law due to the inability to meet federal classifications.”

This means that in order to obtain your state marks, you must be lawfully using the marks in commerce at the time of the application. Therefore, you will need to be licensed in compliance with SB 94,  both at the local and state level, before you’re eligible for trademark approval. Otherwise, if you claim an unlicensed use, you may run into issues with the Secretary of State. Further, once your license is obtained, you must also show that you’re making actual, bona fide use of the trademarks on your products in the stream of commerce. That means that customers are identifying you by your brand when they purchase your goods or services in the marketplace.

CA Cannabis Licensing Explained in 2 Minutes - Video

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on December 31, 2017

As we prepare for January 1 and recreational cannabis in California, many legal questions remain for cannabis businesses. In this video, Los Angeles Cannabis Attorneys Margolin & Lawrence explain the local and state licensing process for cannabis businesses in California. If you are looking for a high level overview of what you will need to do to start a cannabis business, or get your existing cannabis business into compliance, this is the place to start.

L.A. City Council Passes New Cannabis Ordinances

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on December 7, 2017

Yesterday the LA City Council passed three ordinances that will regulate recreational cannabis sales, manufacturing, cultivation, distribution, delivery, and microbusiness in the city of LA. The council also voted on the Social Equity Program and cannabis zoning, including the setbacks from sensitive-use areas that will be required of licensed cannabis businesses. Volatile cannabis manufacturers, for example, will have to be not only 600 feet away from schools, but also at least 200 feet away from any residential parcel.

The city is also imposing caps on the number of licenses granted per neighborhood, so licensing will be a competitive process in some areas; if you haven’t already, now is the time to start preparing your cannabis business for licensure. The city has rigorous requirements for proof of operation in compliance with Prop D if your business is a pre-ICO, as well as strict safety and environmental regulations for marijuana cultivators and manufacturers.

The new regulations passed by the city can be found here:

If you are a cannabis operator with an existing marijuana business in the city of LA, email us at info@margolinlawrence.com to speak with one of our cannabis attorneys. We can advise you on the next steps for your operation as Los Angeles enters a new era for cannabis.

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L.A. City Council Voting on Cannabis Ordinances TODAY

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on December 5, 2017

Cannabis attorney Allison Margolin addressing the LA City Council on the new zoning regulations on Monday:

Today  the LA City Council will vote to determine all of the City's.  the city's new restrictions on where a cannabis business may be located. The current California cannabis law requires that cannabis businesses be located more than 600 feet from all schools.

Los Angeles cannabis attorney

On top of that, LA's most recent draft of its location ordinance required businesses intending to conduct on-site retail sales to be located 750 feet away from sensitive-use areas, including schools, public parks, libraries, and drug treatment facilities, as well as any existing marijuana retail business.

While this is a more lenient approach to sensitive-use areas than LA's previous zoning restrictions, which called for an 800-foot buffer zone, some cannabis businesses and marijuana advocates, including our Los Angeles Cannabis lawyers, argue that introducing two different distancing standards will only complicate the already-opaque standards for marijuana zoning.

The City Council's vote will take place at 10 A.M. tomorrow, December 5th, at 200 N. Spring St.

Update on the L.A. Cannabis Social Equity Program

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on November 29, 2017

Yesterday, the Los Angeles City Council met to discuss cannabis issues before voting on the final ordinance next month. Our Los Angeles Cannabis attorneys were present and are closely following developments on the path to a final LA Cannabis Ordinance and Social Equity Program. Broadly, the Los Angeles Social Equity Program aims to prioritize applicants who were disproportionately impacted by the war on drugs and criminalization of cannabis, and give them an opportunity to participate in the now legal, newly regulated market. 

The discussion yesterday centered around the social equity program and the tier system, which establishes priority to individuals with a criminal history. The social equity program will benefit disadvantaged communities. As a reminder, Tier 1 applicants are those who have a prior cannabis related conviction, a cumulative household income below the federal poverty line and have at least five years residence in an area impacted by the War on Drugs. So the question becomes, should priority be given to individuals with a criminal history? 

Opinions were heard on both sides of the controversial issue. The purpose of the social equity program is to help remove barriers for persons with a criminal history to equitable ownership and employment opportunities. Concerns were raised the criteria for Tier 1 was limited to cannabis only related crimes. The LA Dept. of Cannabis Regulation reasoned the purpose is to provide legitimate business opportunities in a now legalized industry. Oppositions were raised that the tier system did not distinguish between the level of offense such as, a misdemeanor or felony and excludes low income neighborhoods not impacted by the War on Drugs. This suggests person(s) convicted of a minor cannabis crime will have priority over person(s) who have been established in a disproportionately impacted community for many years. Recommendations were made to the Dept. of Cannabis Regulation to define distinct requirements to qualify as a Tier 1 applicant. For more information on the social equity program click here.

In addition to the Social Equity Program, the Council is also considering the revised Location Ordinance which introduces new distancing requirements. An important change to the proposed zoning ordinance is the addition of a 600 foot buffer to sensitive use areas for all activities including cultivation and manufacturing. Make sure you check the location

of your business is compliant with the land use ordinance. The vote is next week so make your voice heard and submit your comments to the City Council by December 4th

If you have questions about the Social Equity Program or the new zoning changes,Contact us to speak with one of our Los Angeles Cannabis Attorneys.

Los Angeles Introduces Cannabis Social Equity Program Criteria

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on November 20, 2017

As we approach the Thanksgiving holiday, Los Angeles is one step closer to cannabis licensing. Here is the latest from our Los Angeles cannabis attorneys who attended today's City Council meeting. Today the Council further discussed the Social Equity Program and the 4 Tiers of priority that will be given to eligible applicants. Tier 1 will get the highest priority for Los Angeles cannabis licensing (after Measure M Retail priority which you can read more about here), and Tier 4 will get the lowest of the Social Equity applicants.

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This blog is not intended as legal advice and should not be taken as such. The possession, use, and/or sale of marijuana is illegal under federal law.