What happens after the temporary cannabis license?

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on March 2, 2018

On January 1, 2018 the state of California began issuing temporary licenses for cannabis operators. We are about halfway through the 120-day period allotted for temporary licenses and the state has allowed an additional 90 day extension so long as businesses submit a complete application for the annual license. Our Los Angeles cannabis attorneys are facing many questions about what happens when the temporary license expires. The answer is that you need to submit for an annual cannabis license from the state. 

Ask a Cannabis Lawyer: Which license do I need for cannabis events? 

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on January 30, 2018

With the rise in popularity of cannabis related events in California such as Kush Stock, Chalice, High Times' Cannabis Cup, Hempcon, and the Secret Sesh; many event organizers and vendors are uncertain as to the new laws relating to cannabis events now that marijuana is legal in California. Our Los Angeles Cannabis attorneys are often asked about events and licensing. The Bureau of Cannabis Control recently issued guidance on just this topic. 

In short, everyone must be licensed. All cannabis event organizers will be required to obtain a cannabis event organizer license from the Bureau of Cannabis Control. The one exception to this is if you are hosting a private event. If your event is open to the public and you are selling tickets to the public, you need an event license. 

The Bureau recently clarified what will be expected of event organizers moving forward in order to comply with all regulations. If you want to sell cannabis products at your event, you will either need vendors who have a retail license there to do the sales, or you will need a retailer license yourself.

The State license fees will be determined by the number of events the organizer plans to produce during that year. However, this event license does not authorize the event organizer to cultivate, distribute, manufacture, or sell cannabis or cannabis products. In order to participate in the sale, cultivation, distribution or manufacturing or cannabis, the organizer must obtain separate licenses to engage in those commercial cannabis activities. This also means that compensation to a cannabis event organizer may not be tied to the sale of cannabis goods.

Once an event organizer obtains their event organizer license from the Bureau, the organizer must then ensure that all cannabis goods transported to the event site are transported by a licensed distributor and that the only vendors permitted to sell at the event to retail customers are a licensed retailer or microbusiness. To further ensure compliance by all participants, event organizers will be required to provide to the Bureau with a list of all licensees selling cannabis on-site at the event.

All cannabis goods sales at the event and access to the area where cannabis consumption is allowed must be limited to individuals 21 years of age and older, and cannabis products and cannabis consumption can’t be visible from any public place or non-age- restricted area. Food trucks are still allowed, but the consumption of alcohol and tobacco is not at cannabis events.

Currently, the State of California is issuing temporary cannabis event licenses for cannabis events that last no longer than four consecutive days. To obtain a temporary cannabis event license, the cannabis event organizer licensee must submit an application to the Bureau at least 60 days before the first day of the cannabis event and must obtain a license for each individual cannabis event from the Bureau for the specific dates and location of the event. Finally, the event organizer must obtain written approval from the local jurisdiction authorizing on-site cannabis sales and consumption by individuals 21 and older. This leaves it up to each individual municipality to determine whether they will allow cannabis events to take place. For example, the Orange County Fair Board members recently voted to prohibit marijuana-related events at the Costa Mesa Fairgrounds. The first cannabis event State license was issued to the Burn Out Music, Art and Cannabis festival scheduled to take place in Tulare County, but was subsequently cancelled by City Officials just two days before the event.

To start the process of applying for your event, you can do so directly on the Bureau of Cannabis Control’s website. For legal advice to ensure the success of your cannabis event, Contact us

It is Time to Reform Asset Forfeiture

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on January 18, 2018

After Jeff Sessions’ January 4 Memo on Marijuana Enforcement, many property owners and business people are wondering if federal asset forfeiture could become a growing problem. The asset forfeiture laws allow the federal government to seize assets (e.g., bank accounts, cash, vehicles, homes, or other buildings) that the government alleges are tied to the distribution or production of controlled substances, including cannabis. They remain a problem for all cannabis businesses, although some recent reforms have reduced the impact of asset forfeiture. 

Ask An LA Cannabis Attorney: Do I need a cannabis water permit?

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on January 4, 2018

The complex cannabis regulations that have been rolled out by local and state governments across California means that as a cannabis operator you will be working with a number of different regulatory agencies. The rules for many of the cannabis activities are promulgated by different agencies - for example, the Bureau of Cannabis Control regulates retail, distribution and delivery in the state of California, while CalCannabis (a division of the CDFA) regulates cannabis cultivation in the state. One area of great confusion for many cannabis cultivators that our Los Angeles cannabis attorneys have been fielding questions on is the issue of obtaining a state water license. The regulations for water were passed in October, and the application portal is currently open to apply for a water permit. The water policy aims to protect California's natural streams and bodies of water from pollution and prevent diversion of water for cannabis cultivation. 

On October 17, 2017, the State Water Board adopted a state-wide policy establishing strict environmental standards for cannabis cultivation. The state-wide policy is designed to protect water flows and water quality in the state of California. All cannabis cultivators will need to comply with this state-wide policy. In addition to complying with the Water Board’s state-wide policy, cultivators will need to comply with all other state, federal and local laws.

The state-wide policy will be implemented through a water quality permit known as the Cannabis General Order and through conditions for cannabis-related water rights known as Cannabis Small Irrigation Use Registration.

All cultivators will need to register their water right and water discharge using the Water Board’s online portal. The Water Board’s online portal can be found here. Depending on the cultivator’s water source, the state-wide policy may or may not apply to them.

To see the cannabis cultivation policy, click here. If you are a cannabis cultivator and have questions relating to the state-wide policy, Contact us to speak with one of our cannabis attorneys. 

Breaking News: LA County Releases Proposed Cannabis Regulations

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on December 19, 2017

L.A. County released long-awaited draft cannabis regulations yesterday. The Board of Supervisors, which creates laws that govern all of the unincorporated areas of the county (any area that is not part of an incorporated city) has been listening to the findings of the Cannabis Advisory Group over many months and has released the zoning requirements that will apply to commercial cannabis in the county, as well as the activities that will be licensed.The County will be issuing for Adult-Use (recreational) and Medical cannabis uses. Our LA cannabis attorneys have reviewed the proposed cannabis regulations and our findings are below. 

How Many Bitcoins to Apply for an L.A. Cannabis License?

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on December 15, 2017

At a meeting this week, the LA City Council adopted a draft ordinance on the subject of the fees and fines for cannabis licensing, bringing the city one step closer to opening its official cannabis licensing process. Our Los Angeles Cannabis Lawyers are often asked how much the compliance process will cost. Now that LA has published their fee schedule, many existing cannabis businesses have sticker shock.  Existing cannabis retailers, for instance, will have to pay nearly $10,000 for an official LA retail license. Cannabis microbusiness owners will need to pay fees for each cannabis activity they are conducting. The City will likely only accepting payment in cash or by check (no bitcoin, yet).

A Macro-Overview of Cannabis Microbusiness Laws In California

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on December 13, 2017

Our Los Angeles Cannabis Attorneys are constantly fielding questions about a popular license category called microbusiness. The Type 12 license allows you to engage in multiple cannabis activities on the same premises. For example, you could cultivate up to 10,000 sq. ft. of canopy, and distribute, and deliver under one license for microbusiness. The chance to diversify your business and conduct multiple activities under one license is appealing to many existing and prospective cannabis business owners.

The Bureau of Cannabis Control (BCC), released their final regulations for cannabis microbusiness licensees last week, after revising them post SB-94 (you can read more about the process here). Here’s what they have to say about the restrictions on cannabis microbusinesses:

  • Microbusinesses must engage in at least 3 different commercial cannabis activities
  • Microbusiness applicants have to describe operating procedures as required for each activity
  • If a microbusiness license is revoked or suspended, it affects every activity done using that license
  • Microbusiness license fees range from $5,000 to $120,000 depending on size of operation (up to $5 million)
  • Retail operations & Microbusinesses with retail sales can give out free samples to medicinal marijuana customers, as long as it meets the same conditions as normal retail sales
  • Sales at events are allowed
  • Retailers & Microbusinesses with retail will have to employ security guards

If you’re interested in learning more about cannabis microbusiness or retail, Contact us to speak to a Los Angeles Cannabis attorney. 

 

Breaking news: California releases emergency cannabis regulations

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on November 16, 2017

Today, California’s three state cannabis licensing authorities released proposed emergency licensing regulations for commercial medicinal and adult-use cannabis. The regulations are intended to reflect the law that was set out in California’s Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA), and will replace the draft regulations that were released for cannabis cultivation, manufacturing, retail and other activities in April 2017 (you can read more about the prior regulations in our post here).  These regulations will allow the state to start issuing temporary licenses to conduct commercial cannabis activities on January 1. Our San Francisco and Los Angeles cannabis attorneys are analyzing the new regulations and comparing them to the previous draft and we will do a more in depth post on what has changed very soon. 

Does my California Cannabis Business have to be a nonprofit?

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on October 10, 2017

The short answer is yes, for now. Until the law changes, you need to operate as a nonprofit. You should also prepare yourself for for-profit operation so that your business is not caught off guard when the law does change. There is a great deal of misinformation and misunderstanding about how cannabis businesses are allowed to be organized in California.  California Health & Safety Code § 11362.765 is the law of the land, stating in part: “nor shall anything in this section authorize any individual or group to cultivate or distribute cannabis for profit.”  Note that this section was not repealed or replaced by any provisions in SB 94 (our Guide to SB94 is available here). Appellate decisions have interpreted this language to mean that all cannabis cultivation and distribution in the state is required to be conducted on a non-profit basis, and that anyone cultivating or distributing cannabis “for profit" is subject to criminal sanctions (currently a misdemeanor in most cases, with potential jail time and fines).

State of MJ 2017 – Cannabis Lawyers & Entrepreneurs Convene in DTLA

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on August 29, 2017

Los Angeles cannabis lawyer Allison Margolin spoke at the State of Marijuana conference this past weekend. In this video clip, she gives an overview of the cannabis licensing process in California. If you haven't heard, you need to get local authorization (which can mean a license or something less official like local government officials signing off on your project to the state) in order to apply for a California cannabis license when it becomes available January 1, 2018. Our cannabis attorneys are familiar with local jurisdictions statewide and are actively advising our clients on the nuances and complexities of zoning, the application process, and compliance with local ordinances. 

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This blog is not intended as legal advice and should not be taken as such. The possession, use, and/or sale of marijuana is illegal under federal law.