DCR Accepting Applications for Undue Concentration in Los Angeles

Posted by Zachary Tucker on September 17, 2019


 

Don't panic. Although the first application cycle for cannabis retail licensing in the City of Los Angeles closed this morning, the real fun is only beginning. After today, the City’s Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR) will begin to process and review applications submitted in Round 1. Over 800 applications were submitted in the first round, but only 100 applicants will be issued a license through this electronic process. Applicants who are unable to obtain a license in Round 1 of Phase 3 will be eligible to apply for one of the 150 licenses to be issued in Round 2, although it is anticipated that the final round will yield an even larger applicant turnout. However, applicants can apply for a license in an area of undue concentration, and there is no limit on the number of licenses that can be issued through the undue concentration process. Under Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC) SEC. 104.20 (Part a.), the number of Social Equity licenses to non-Social Equity licenses is 2:1, which means that if 190 licenses were issues through Measure M Priority Round 1, 380 should be issued through a combination of Round 1 and Round 2 Phase 3 processing, and the "Public Convenience or Necessity (PCN)" process (for areas of undue concentration) described below. If the city abides by its own ratio, 130 retail storefront licenses will be authorized in addition to the 250 through the electronic process. 

Alternative Dispute Resolution in Cannabis

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on September 12, 2019

On September 12th, M&L partner Raza Lawrence participated in a roundtable discussion with a group of attorneys in Downtown LA regarding alternative dispute resolution in cannabis law.  This is a growing field becoming more and more important for people operating or starting a cannabis business.  Starting a new cannabis business can be complicated, lengthy, and expensive, often including multiple investors, loans, licenses, employees, asset purchases, and phases of construction.  As people adapt to the new licensed and regulated system, they are forming new companies and making large investments, and want to have ways to make sure their investment is protected and any disputes are resolved efficiently and fairly.

Now, commercial cannabis operators in California need both local and state licenses, and to comply with detailed local and state regulations.  In Los Angeles, the structure and procedure of licensing is complicated further by the social equity program requiring many dispensary licenses to be majority-owned by social equity candidates who meet certain qualifications based on their history of living in certain parts of the city, being arrested for cannabis crimes, and being low income.  In addition, cultivation, manufacturing, and distribution licenses in Los Angeles remain tied to “priority” applicants who can show a history of operating in the City, further complicating the business structures.  


Disputes and problems inevitably arise when starting any business, even with the most careful plans.  This is especially true with California’s complicated and changing cannabis laws, and the continued conflict with federal law.  Until recently, California did not regulate or license commercial cannabis businesses.  Instead, there was an affirmative defense to the criminal laws to people who operated as nonprofit medical marijuana collectives, jointly owned by all members.  Collectives and medical marijuana operators were frequently arrested and prosecuted even when they tried to do things the right way, and laws were vague and unpredictably enforced.  People tended to keep few if any records, because they did not want to keep evidence of criminal activity.  Many cannabis businesses today are continuations or offshoots of these earlier, unregulated businesses, and have some disputes and growing pains when trying to adapt to the new laws.


People in the cannabis industry have traditionally shied away from courts , preferring to resolve disputes through informal means.  That is because what happens in court becomes public record, and testimony and evidence presented in court could incriminate people for violating state or federal criminal laws, or even lead to asset forfeiture.  For licensed operators, testifying in court continues to incriminate them under federal law.  Distributing cannabis remains illegal under federal law, a felony with potential long jail sentences and asset forfeiture.  While there are legal protections against prosecutions for state-licensed medical cannabis operators, the federal law complicates the legal landscape, making court results unpredictable.  It can be difficult to even enforce a cannabis-related contract in court, given the federal illegality.  Under the US constitution, federal law controls over state law when there is any conflict in the laws, including in the area of cannabis.  In addition, many judges and courts start out biased against cannabis, having prosecuted and convicted cannabis defendants with felony charges for years.


Today, as people try to get their companies off the ground and adapt to the new legal regime, they need efficient and effective ways to resolve their inevitable problems and challenges.  Court cases are expensive and take a long time.  Arbitration and mediation can be much faster and cheaper, and a way to avoid potentially biased and uninformed judges.  For all these reasons, we recommend that parties include alternative dispute resolutions in their contracts, requiring the parties to submit any disputes to mediation or arbitration and bypass the traditional court system.  This way, parties can select someone they trust to resolve their dispute, using a transparent process agreed to by everyone.


Our law firm has helped numerous people and businesses resolve disputes relating to commercial cannabis.  If you have a dispute involving your business, or are looking for ways to avoid them, you can contact our firm for help you find a solution.

Northern california delivery applications

Posted by Sara Adams on July 25, 2019

 

Take Our Quiz to Find Out if You May Qualify for Social Equity

Posted by Zachary Tucker on June 13, 2019
 

Retail Cannabis Licensing Draft Ordinance Heads to L.A. City Council

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on June 4, 2019

On Tuesday, May 28, the Los Angeles City Attorney Michael Feuer filed a draft ordinance regarding retail cannabis licensing.

Not a Hallucination: Oakland Moves Closer to Legalizing Mushrooms

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on May 31, 2019

While much of California continues to break boundaries on legalizing cannabis, Oakland is poised to follow in Denver’s footsteps in bringing a different substance to the mainstream: natural psychedelics.

California Ready to Embrace Hemp-Derived CBD in Foods and Supplements

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on May 28, 2019

 

New Cannabis Legislation in Riverside County

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on October 30, 2018

Last Tuesday, the Board of Supervisors in Riverside County approved an ordinance allowing the following commercial activities starting on 26th December: Testing, Manufacturing, Distribution and Wholesale Nurseries. There is now a 60-day deliberative period regarding the cannabis businesses in Riverside based on the newly approved ordinance. The Board also voted to allow a limited number of dispensaries and cultivators to operate in 2019. Up to nineteen dispensaries and fifty grows will be permitted in unincorporated Riverside County as decided by a 3-2 vote following a public hearing that last nearly four hours. The Board also approved an “Implementation Plan for Retail and Cultivation” uses that is scheduled for process in early January 2019. The proposal process will include pre-registration by interested applicants, and the issuance of a Request for Proposals by the Planning Department. However, there are certain conditions that will be enforced regarding additional taxation and fees associated with each of these activities as determined by the Planning Commission.

Cannabis Business Law

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on October 19, 2018

California cannabis entrepreneurs have to go through the often lengthy and cumbersome process of applying for local and state commercial cannabis licenses.  But that is only the beginning of the journey to becoming a successful, fully-compliant business in this emerging industry.

Entrepreneurs interested in operating a cannabis business in California must decide how their business will operate and what business structure will work best for their specific business goals. They must consider the commercial, legal, and tax implications that come with deciding which business structure they want to operate under.  

Once entrepreneurs have decided which business structure will best work for their specific business goals, the next step is to begin the entity formation process. This process consists of deciding what the Company name will be and drafting the entity formation documents that will determine how your cannabis business will operate.

As a full-service cannabis law firm, we represent many clients who have gone through this process already. Two of the most common business structures we have seen entrepreneurs decide to start their cannabis business as have been Limited Liability Companies (LLCs) and Corporations. Although there are some similarities between both business structures, there are some major differences that entrepreneurs need to understand prior to beginning the entity formation process.  

At Margolin & Lawrence, our cannabis attorneys can help you with all the formation and governing documents for your LLC, such as the articles of organization, operating agreements, and statements of information. If you decide on structuring your cannabis business as a corporation, our cannabis attorneys can help you with your corporate formation documents such as bylaws and articles of incorporation.

Additionally, we understand how important it is for new businesses to raise capital to continue to grow their business. Given that cannabis is still illegal under federal law, entrepreneurs looking to raise capital for their cannabis business need to seek private investment capital. In order to do so, there are a series of important documents private investors want to examine before they decide to invest in your cannabis business.

For instance, companies looking to raise capital need private placement memoranda (PPMs) and subscription agreements. A PPM is a legal document that is given to prospective investors when selling stock or any other security interest in a business. The PPM provides prospective investors with an in-depth look at your business, including management, analysis of operations, risks factors, financial information, among other things. The goal of the PPM is for prospective investors to be fully informed about all aspects of your cannabis business.

A subscription agreement is an agreement between a corporation and the investor (the subscriber) in which the corporation promises to sell a certain number of shares at a specific price to the subscriber and, in return, the subscriber promises to buy the shares at the agreed upon price.

At Margolin & Lawrence, our cannabis attorneys can help you and your business with any capital-raising compliance and legal representation. Additionally, our cannabis attorneys can help you decide which business structure best meets your cannabis business goals. And we can help your cannabis business remain compliant with all the governing laws every step of the way, including ongoing compliance with state and local commercial cannabis regulations and employment laws, avoiding and minimizing the expenses of civil litigation, addressing the implications of federal illegality of cannabis, and helping to informally resolve any internal or external disputes that jeopardize the business operation.

Central Coast Update

Posted by Jenna Rompel on October 16, 2018

Commercial cannabis is heating up on the central coast. Here’s a look at what’s green:

The City of Goleta began accepting cannabis planning applications on August 17th. Applicants will need to obtain either a Land Use Permit or Conditional Use Permit issued by the Planning & Environmental Review (PER) Department. A Cannabis Business License will only be issued upon approval by the PER Department. Applicants are required to submit an Odor Abatement Plan and Certification approved by a Professional Engineer or Certified Industrial Hygienist. In addition, cultivators will need to show proof of consultation with Southern California Edison (SCE) showing participating in SCE’s Savings by Design Program as well as participation in the Resource Innovation Institute’s Calculate Powerscore Tool. More information on Conditional Use Permits and Land Use Permits for cannabis operators in the City of Goleta can be found here.

Cannabis Business Licenses will be valid for one year from January 1 to December 31, regardless of when the license was issued. Something to consider as we approach the latter end of the year, as all businesses will need to renew their license prior to January 1 and pay the applicable renewal fee. The amount of retail licenses the city will issue has been limited to 15. The city will review applications on a first-come, first-serve basis and will implement a waitlist for potential retailers. More information on Cannabis Business Licenses for the City of Goleta can be found here.

The City of Lompoc is open for all cannabis operators with the exception of outdoor cultivators. Currently, there is no cap to the amount of licenses the city will issue and will allow for onsite consumption. Prospective operators will need to obtain a commercial cannabis use license issued by the City. Application materials and information on the city’s laws and regulations can be found here.

Santa Barbara County is expected to open by the end of the year for new businesses. Prospective applicants will first need to obtain either a Land Use Permit or Conditional Use Permit. Permit type is dependent on whether you are located inside or outside the Coastal Zone and distance to sensitive use receptors. Check here for information on land use and zoning in Santa Barbara County. A maximum of 8 licenses will be issued for retailers and all outdoor cultivation has been prohibited in the Coastal Zone. Once you have received the applicable land use or conditional use permit, you will then need to apply for a Cannabis Business License. Application materials for a Cannabis Business License will be made available here. Supplemental information may be required such as, environmental and energy conservation measures dependent on your zone. Be sure to check through the application requirements carefully and thoroughly or consider hiring an attorney to breakdown the process.

For more information on cannabis licensing, check out our guide to California cannabis laws or reach out to us at info@margolinlawrence.com.

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This blog is not intended as legal advice and should not be taken as such. The possession, use, and/or sale of marijuana is illegal under federal law.