DCR Accepting Applications for Undue Concentration in Los Angeles

Posted by Zachary Tucker on September 17, 2019


 

Don't panic. Although the first application cycle for cannabis retail licensing in the City of Los Angeles closed this morning, the real fun is only beginning. After today, the City’s Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR) will begin to process and review applications submitted in Round 1. Over 800 applications were submitted in the first round, but only 100 applicants will be issued a license through this electronic process. Applicants who are unable to obtain a license in Round 1 of Phase 3 will be eligible to apply for one of the 150 licenses to be issued in Round 2, although it is anticipated that the final round will yield an even larger applicant turnout. However, applicants can apply for a license in an area of undue concentration, and there is no limit on the number of licenses that can be issued through the undue concentration process. Under Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC) SEC. 104.20 (Part a.), the number of Social Equity licenses to non-Social Equity licenses is 2:1, which means that if 190 licenses were issues through Measure M Priority Round 1, 380 should be issued through a combination of Round 1 and Round 2 Phase 3 processing, and the "Public Convenience or Necessity (PCN)" process (for areas of undue concentration) described below. If the city abides by its own ratio, 130 retail storefront licenses will be authorized in addition to the 250 through the electronic process. 

Phase 3 Round 1 Application Aftermath:

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on September 5, 2019

Just yesterday, the Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR) opened up the application process for Round 1 of Phase 3 retail storefront licenses in the City of Los Angeles. Due to heavy restrictions and high demand, appropriate locations for these storefronts can be difficult to come by. Many applicants have locations which meet all guidelines, yet still fall within a community plan area that has reached “undue concentration.” Here’s the 411 on what is expected to happen after the opening of Phase 3 Round 1 applications:

Everything You Need to Know About Los Angeles Phase 3 Licensing

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on July 28, 2019

 

What's the 411 on 420 and "Undue Concentration?"

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on July 3, 2019

Recently, rumors and misinformation have circulated surrounding LA’s “undue concentration” rules for commercial cannabis licensing. The undue concentration rules have not been eliminated, as some have falsely claimed. LA has recently changed details about the policy, in a way that will allow more retail dispensary licenses to be issued sooner. Some have feared, however, that the latest changes may introduce an element of unfairness to the licensing process.

Take Our Quiz to Find Out if You May Qualify for Social Equity

Posted by Zachary Tucker on June 13, 2019
 

Cracking Down on Compliance

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on April 30, 2019

     

     Operational compliance has become paramount to the success of many cannabis businesses following new state regulations that went into effect earlier this year.  For others, non-compliance has been a great downfall. Following the legalization of commercial cannabis, the state of California hastily drafted and passed emergency regulations which outlined licensing and operational requirements for cannabis businesses under the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA). These emergency regulations went into effect in December of 2017 to provide a temporary solution for the lack of cannabis legislation until more thorough regulations could be drafted and adopted by state agencies. Just three months ago, the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) approved new regulations which were immediately adopted by all three state licensing agencies. The new regulations include many significant changes from the previous emergency regulations and introduce more restrictive guidelines for cannabis businesses. Further, the new regulations define serious implications for businesses who violate the new guidelines – from fines up to $250,000 to loss of licensure. In recent months, a rapid number of compliance enforcement agencies have emerged at both the local and state level. Licensed cannabis businesses in California have experienced a peak in random compliance inspection visits, raids from local and state law enforcement, and seizure of cannabis products. With the commercial cannabis industry now in full effect, local and state agencies are beginning to focus less on setting the framework for the industry and more on enforcement of regulations.

A majority of licensed cannabis businesses are in some way in violation of current regulations despite their intentional efforts to comply. This is largely due to the cumbersome location-dependent nature of cannabis regulations. Although cannabis is legal in the state of California, commercial cannabis businesses are still federally illegal, and there is no federal legislation governing the licensing and operational compliance of cannabis businesses. As a result, cannabis regulations vary between states. Further convoluting the concept of cannabis compliance, regulations also vary within-state and are dependent on legislation issued by local authorities. All California cannabis businesses must adhere to statewide regulations enforced by the three state agencies – the Bureau of Cannabis Control (BCC), the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), and the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA)  – in addition to guidelines enforced by local agencies. For instance, outdoor cultivation is legal at the state level per the CDFA, but it is prohibited within the City of Los Angeles per the local Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR). Cannabis businesses must also comply with local Fire Department safety codes which also vary by jurisdiction.

With compliance enforcement on the rise, it is crucial for all cannabis businesses to stay informed about both state and local regulations in order to avoid high penalties or business closure.  Our firm offers full-coverage compliance counseling to licensed cannabis businesses. Our team is in regular attendance of local city hall and county government meetings pertaining to commercial cannabis in all areas of California and maintains current knowledge of the ever-changing regulations. We provide counsel in all areas of business compliance for cannabis retailers, distributors, cultivators, and microbusinesses. Our attorneys have a combined 20+ years of experience in the commercial cannabis industry and are active in compliance consulting throughout the state. We are able to provide our clients with expert contractors in building safety code pre-inspection, packaging and labeling compliance, product inventory and storage, advertisement restrictions, etc. We would love to help ensure that your cannabis business is successful and in compliance with all local and state regulations, giving you one less thing to worry about. If you have any questions or would like to speak with our attorneys to further discuss our compliance services, please feel free to reach us via email (info@margolinlawrence.com) or phone (323-253-9700). 

L.A. Retail Cannabis Legislation Moves Forward: What Happens Now

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on April 22, 2019

 

 

Wednesday, April 17 - The City of Los Angeles Rules, Elections, and Intergovernmental Relations Committee discussed and approved an April 12, 2019 report and proposed ordinance from the LA City Attorney regarding cannabis licensing, with recommendations to make some amendments.

All recommendations were approved and will be redrafted for Council consideration and presented on Tuesday, April 30.

Today’s meeting moves the City closer to the opening of the highly anticipated Phase 3, which is the first chance that will allow the general public to receive dispensary licenses. The City Attorney was directed to make requested changes to the proposed new ordinance, to present for City Council consideration on April 30.

 

Notable Takeaways from Wednesday’s Meeting

The City of Los Angeles and the DCR have been hard at work in recent months, particularly as they sort through the specifics of Phase 3. While Phases 1 and 2 focused on existing cannabis dispensaries, non-retailers (i.e. growers and manufacturers), and social equity applicants, Phase 3 has been the main attraction for many entrepreneurs and would-be business owners looking to break into the industry.

In an earlier April meeting, the fate of Phase 3 was largely unknown due to funding. The DCR claimed that licensing was on hold as they awaited the Fee Deferral Program, which would allow Phase 3 to commence.

While a date has not been announced for the opening of Phase 3 applications, Wednesday’s meeting shed some light as to the direction the City and DCR are taking to solidify the process.

 

Among the notable new details that are coming out through these recent meetings and reports are:

● Changes to the Los Angeles Municipal Code establishing a first come, first served application process for retailer commercial cannabis activity licenses, with details regarding what is required for an application to be considered complete

● A proposal to allow applications for retail storefront dispensaries beginning January 1, 2020, in neighborhoods that have already exceeded Undue Concentration caps, with City Council approval

● Modifications to the process for issuing non-storefront retail licenses

● Allowing the Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR) to grant Temporary Approval to Phase 3 storefront retail applicants

● Exempting Phase 2 applicants from the Undue Concentration requirements

● Setting deadlines for Phase 2 applicants to finalize their business location (May 15) and obtain Temporary Approval (substantial progress by July 1)

● Revising various requirements to qualify as a Tier 3 Social Equity Applicant and revising various benefits provided to Tier 1 and Tier 2 Social Equity Applicants

● Adding an additional reason to deny a license application — if the City has taken enforcement action against unlicensed cannabis activity at the same address since January 2018

● Clarifying the definition of license ownership relative to management companies

 

In addition, one of the recommendations to the draft ordinance that was approved on Wednesday was to instruct the DCR to finalize a timeline for all Phase 3 and Type 9 Pilot activities and post the information on the Department’s website. This indicates that an exact date for Phase 3 licensing could be established by April 30, if not sooner.

 

City Council Action Unanimously Passed Today

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on April 11, 2019

The LA City Council held a meeting today to follow up on the April 1 meeting of the Budget Committee and approve the recommendations made on April 1.  After a good deal of discussion about the enforcement efforts against unlicensed dispensaries, the City Council approved all the recommendations with only minor revisions.  This means the licensing process can now move forward. 

The funding approved today by the City Council will allow the Social Equity Program to move forward, which is an integral part of the upcoming Phase 3 licensing process awarding cannabis licenses to new businesses in the City of LA.  So far, the licensing has been delayed while the City has worked through issues surrounding the Social Equity Program.  We are still waiting for the City to announce details of the timing of the next phase of LA cannabis licensing.  This phase will start with the issuance of 200 retail storefront and 40 retail delivery licenses, issued largely to Social Equity applicants.  

Now that the City Council has approved the Social Equity funding, we expect the licensing to open up soon, and now is the time for anyone interested in applying to find a property and get all the elements of their applications in order.
Before the ruling on the Social Equity funding, there was an update on enforcement efforts against unlicensed cannabis businesses, including utilities disconnects, cease and desist letters, and search warrants.

So far, the City has been shutting down the illegal businesses bureau by bureau.  The City started the crackdown in the Valley, where it has gone to 22 locations, with 10 more scheduled for next week when it will be finished with the Valley.  Then, it will move to the South bureau, where it will start with 10 locations in the Harbor area, and then move to the Southeast.  The City has also been disconnecting utilities from unlicensed businesses in the past month.  $2.3 million has been set aside by the police department for cannabis enforcement. 

DCR Prepares to Open Phase 3 Applications

Posted by Margolin & Lawrence on April 2, 2019

An Important Step Forward for Los Angeles Cannabis Licensing – DCR Prepares to Open Phase 3 Applications, Starting with Retail for Social Equity Applicants

 Cannabis licensing has been on the lips of hundreds of interested Los Angeles retailers and users for months.  Important steps were taken to move the process forward at yesterday’s meeting of the Los Angeles Budget and Finance Committee at City Hall.  During the meeting on April 1, City reps discussed delays in the licensing due to the delayed funding for the social equity program. It was also revealed that many people in LA have been holding properties for months waiting for the license application process to open up.

In order to continue with the licensing process, based on the specifics of the LA ordinance, the City of Los Angeles needs to issue a set number of retail dispensary licenses to social equity applicants (defined so that people may qualify based on low-income status, having a prior cannabis arrest, and/or living in specified zip codes within the City for at least 5 or 10 years that have had the most cannabis arrests). 

For several months, interested parties have been awaiting the opening of “Phase 3” of Los Angeles’s cannabis licensing program, which is the first opportunity for members the general public to apply for cannabis licenses in the City.  The previous two phases awarded licenses to certain qualified “priority” retail and non-retail businesses who had been operating in the City since before 2016. 

The City is required to issue retail dispensary licenses to social equity applicants on a 2:1 ratio as compared to non-social equity applicants.  To date, the City has issued 178 Phase 1 retail (non-social equity) applications, meaning that it needs to issue 356 social equity licenses in order to catch up with the required ratio.  To start reaching these numbers, the City has proposed issuing 200 licenses (in two batches of 100) to social equity applicants.

This process has been delayed because, under the City’s law, social equity applicants are entitled to receive certain business licensing and compliance assistance, but so far there have been no funds allotted to provide this assistance.  At yesterday’s meeting, the Budget and Finance Committee finally approved funding for the social equity program, meaning the whole licensing process can now move forward.

DCR’s New Tool to Aid Prospective Phase 3 Retail Applicants in Their Property Search & State to Issue Provisional Licenses to Qualified Temporary License Holders

Posted by Zachary Tucker on March 29, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF CANNABIS REGULATION’S NEW INTERACTIVE MAP

The Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR), the governing agency regulating commercial cannabis activities for the City of Los Angeles, released a new interactive map this week which highlights the number of retail licenses available for applications in each of the 35 Community Plan Areas in the City. The map shows the maximum number of retail licenses approved (i.e., “license capacity”) for each Community Plan Area as well as how many of those licenses are available or otherwise occupied by retailers currently in operation.

The interactive map will be particularly useful for prospective applicants who want to pursue a dispensary license during the next and final round of licensing for the City and need to identify eligible properties for a potential retail location. Many retail licenses have already been distributed which has greatly limited the number of remaining licenses available for application in each Community Plan Area. The limited number of vacant licenses has further complicated the property search process for prospective applicants -- a process already restricted by distance and sensitive use requirements defined by the Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC). LAMC mandates that all retail locations be at least 700’ away from other licensed cannabis retailers and other “sensitive use” properties (e.g., public parks, public libraries). Further, it restricts the location of potential retail establishments to nine zones as defined by the City’s planning website through Zimas.

Eligible Zones for Cannabis Retail Locations as Defined by The LA Department of City Planning:

  • C1 Limited Commercial Zone

  • C1.5 Limited Commercial Zone

  • C2 Commercial Zone

  • C4 Commercial Zone

  • C5 Commercial Zone

  • CM Commercial Manufacturing Zone

  • M1 Limited Industrial Zone

  • M2 Light Industrial Zone

  • M3 Heavy Industrial Zone


 

STATE TO ISSUE PROVISIONAL LICENSES BEFORE EXPIRATION OF TEMPORARY LICENSES

Today, the Bureau of Cannabis Control, California Department of Public Health, and California Department of Food and Agriculture announced a plan to prevent lapses in licensure for retailers who have active temporary commercial cannabis licenses that will soon expire. The three licensing agencies are tracking the expiration dates of all active temporary licenses and intend to issue a provisional license to eligible retailers who currently have a temporary license prior to its expiration. To qualify for a provisional license, applicants must:

(1) Hold or have held a temporary license for the same premises and the same commercial cannabis activity for which the provisional license will be issued; and

(2) Have submitted a completed license application to the licensing authority, which must include a document or statement indicating that California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) compliance is underway.

In today’s announcement, the three licensing agencies urged that any temporary license holders who are contacted by their state licensing authority reply promptly in order to avoid a lapse in licensure.

Categories

This blog is not intended as legal advice and should not be taken as such. The possession, use, and/or sale of marijuana is illegal under federal law.